Border Collie
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Border Collie


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Aktivitet:
Pelsstell:
Passer for:
Allergi:

 
Border Collie:
FCI:
Anerkjent av FCI
FCI nummer: 297
Gruppe 1: Bruks-, hyrde- og gjeterhunder
Seksjon 1: Fårehunder
 
AKC:
Anerkjent av AKC
Herding
The Herding Group, created in 1983, is the newest AKC classification; its members were formerly members of the Working Group. All breeds share the fabulous ability to control the movement of other animals. A remarkable example is the low-set Corgi, perhaps one foot tall at the shoulders, that can drive a herd of cows many times its size to pasture by leaping and nipping at their heels. The vast majority of Herding dogs, as household pets, never cross paths with a farm animal. Nevertheless, pure instinct prompts many of these dogs to gently herd their owners, especially the children of the family. In general, these intelligent dogs make excellent companions and respond beautifully to training exercises.
STØRRELSE: Middels
VEKT: Hann: 15-22kg
Tispe: 13-20kg
HØYDE: Hann: 52-55cm
Tispe: 50-53cm
FARGE(R): Sort og hvit, kan også være brun og hvit eller sort og hvit med brune innslag
PELSLENGDE: Langhåret,kan også være semi-lang eller semi-kort
PELS: Glatt, blank og liggende.
PELSSTELL: Endel
ALLERGI: Ja
AKTIVITET: Mye
 

Treff i DogLex

Border Collie
Agility
[... agility er en spennende og fartsfylt hundesport, der både hund og hundefører må være på h&osla...]
Familiehund
[...familiehund og selskapshund er betegnelser som benyttes om hunder som har som primæroppgave å være en sosial partner og venn for med...]
Flyball
[...flyball (international flyball racing) er en ny form for hundesport som er i ferd med å spre seg over hele verden, herunder også til norge. sporten ...]
Fårehunder
[...fårehunder er hunder som primært er avlet for å gjete sau (får). som hunderase inngår disse hundene gjerne i samlebegrepet gjeterhunder, men i gjernin...]
Gjeterhunder
[...gjeterhunder og kveghunder (av eng. sheepdogs and cattle dogs) er en fci gruppe som består av hunder som deles inn i de to undergruppene fårehunder og...]
Tamhund
[...tamhund (canis lupus familiaris), i norge også kalt hund, bisk, bikkje, kjøter og menneskets beste venn, er i realiteten en domestisert ulv som mennes...]
 

Border Collie
Om Border Collie:

The workaholic of the dog world, the Border Collie is the world’s premier sheep herder, prized for its intelligence, extraordinary instinct and working ability. Medium-sized and athletic, the breed controls stock with stalking movement and an intense gaze known as "eye." The Border Collie coat can be rough or smooth and includes any color in bi-color, tri-color, merle, sable, or solid patterns.

A Look Back
In the border country between Scotland and England, Border Collies (first classified as the "Scotch Sheep Dog") were invaluable to shepherds by allowing them to maintain large flocks of sheep. The breed as we know it today has been around for more than 100 years. In the second half of the 19th century, Queen Victoria spotted a Border Collie and became an active enthusiast. At this point, the divergence between our modern Collie and the Border Collie began.

Right Breed for You?
This high-drive breed is extremely energetic and requires exercise beyond just a walk around the block or a romp in the yard. They thrive when they have a job to do and space to run. Due to their tendency to herd objects and people, they do best with mature, well-behaved children. They love their families, but may be somewhat reserved with strangers. They are seasonal shedders, and require regular brushing.

  • Herding Group; AKC recognized in 1995.
  • Ranging in size from 18 to 22 inches tall at the shoulder.
  • Sheep herder.

Rasebeskrivelse:

Preamble - The Border Collie originated in the border country between Scotland and England where the shepherds' breeding selection was based on biddable stock sense and the ability to work long days on rugged terrain. As a result of this selective breeding, the Border Collie developed the unique working style of gathering and fetching the stock with wide sweeping outruns. The stock is then controlled with an intense gaze known as "eye", coupled with a stalking style of movement. This selective breeding over hundreds of years developed the Border Collie's intensity, energy and trainability which are features so important that they are equal to physical size and appearance. The Border Collie has extraordinary instinct and an uncanny ability to reason. One of its greatest assets is the ability to work out of sight of its master without commands. Breeding based on this working ability has made this breed the world's premier sheep herding dog, a job the Border Collie is still used for worldwide.

General Appearance
The Border Collie is a well balanced, medium-sized dog of athletic appearance, displaying style and agility in equal measure with soundness and strength. Its hard, muscular body conveys the impression of effortless movement and endless endurance. The Border Collie is extremely intelligent, with its keen, alert expression being a very important characteristic of the breed. Any aspect of structure or temperament that would impede the dog's ability to function as a herding dog should be severely faulted. The Border Collie is, and should remain, a natural and unspoiled true working sheep dog whose conformation is described herein. Honorable scars and broken teeth incurred in the line of duty are acceptable.

Size, Proportion, Substance
The height at the withers varies from 19" to 22" for males, 18" to 21" for females. The body, from prosternum to point of buttocks, is slightly longer than the height at the withers with the length to height ratio being approximately 10:9. Bone must be strong, medium being correct but lighter bone is preferred over heavy. Overall balance between height, length, weight and bone is crucial and is more important than any absolute measurement. Dogs must be presented in hard working condition. Excess body weight is not to be mistaken for muscle or substance. Any single feature of size appearing out of proportion should be considered a fault.

Head
Expression is intelligent, alert, eager, and full of interest. Eyes are set well apart, of moderate size, oval in shape. The color encompasses the full range of brown eyes, dogs having body colors other than black may have noticeably lighter eye color. Blue eyes (with one, both or part of one or both eyes being blue) in dogs other than merle, are acceptable but not preferred. Eye rims should be fully pigmented, lack thereof considered a fault according to degree. Ears are of medium size, set well apart, one or both carried erect and/or semi-erect (varying from 1/4 to 3/4 of the ear erect). When semi-erect, the tips may fall forward or outward to the side. Ears are sensitive and mobile. Skull is relatively flat and moderate in width. The skull and muzzle are approximately equal in length. In profile the top of the skull is parallel with the top of the muzzle. Stop moderate, but distinct. The muzzle is strong, tapering slightly to the nose. The underjaw is strong and well developed. A domed, blocky or very narrow skull is faulty according to degree, as is cheekiness and a snipey muzzle. Nose color matches the primary body color. Nostrils are well developed. Lack of nose pigmentation is a fault according to degree. Bite: Teeth and jaws are strong, meeting in a scissors bite. Complete dentition is required. Missing molars or pre-molars are serious faults as is an undershot or overshot bite.

Neck, Topline, Body
Neck is of proportional length to the body, strong and muscular, slightly arched and blending smoothly into the shoulders. Topline: Back is level from behind the withers to the slightly arched, muscular loins, falling to a gently sloping croup. Body is athletic in appearance with a deep, moderately broad chest reaching no further than the point of the elbow. The rib cage is moderately long with well sprung ribs. Loins moderately deep and short, muscular, slightly arched and with a slight but distinct tuck up. The tail is set on low and is moderately long with the bone reaching at least to the hock. The ideal tail carriage is low when the dog is concentrating on a given task and may have a slight upward swirl at the end like a shepherd's crook. In excitement, it may be raised proudly and waved like a banner, showing a confident personality. A tail curled over the back is a fault.

Forequarters
Forelegs should be parallel when viewed from front, pasterns slightly sloping when viewed from side. Because sufficient length of leg is crucial for the type of work the breed is required to do, the distance from the wither to the elbow is slightly less than from the elbow to the ground and legs that are too short in proportion to the rest of the body are a serious fault. The shoulder blades are long, well laid back and well-angulated to the upper arm. Shoulder blades and upper arms are equal in length. There is sufficient width between the tops of the shoulder blades to allow for the characteristic crouch when approaching and moving stock. The elbows are neither in nor out. Feet are compact, oval in shape; pads deep and strong, toes moderately arched and close together with strong nails of moderate length. Dewclaws may be removed.

Hindquarters
Broad and muscular, in profile sloping gracefully to the low set tail. The thighs are long, broad, deep and muscular. Stifles are well turned with strong hocks that may be either parallel or very slightly turned in. Dewclaws should be removed. Feet, although slightly smaller, are the same as front.

Coat
Two varieties are permissible, both having close-fitting, dense, weather resistant double coats with the top coat either straight or wavy and coarser in texture than the undercoat which is soft, short and dense. The rough variety is medium in length without being excessive. Forelegs, haunches, chest and underside are feathered and the coat on face, ears, feet, fronts of legs is short and smooth. The smooth variety is short over entire body, is usually coarser in texture than the rough variety and may have slight feathering on forelegs, haunches, chest and ruff. Neither coat type is preferred over the other. Seasonal shedding is normal and should not be penalized. The Border Collie's purpose as an actively working herding dog shall be clearly evident in its presentation. Excess hair on the feet, hock and pastern areas may be neatened for the show ring. Whiskers are untrimmed. Dogs that are overly groomed (trimmed and/or sculpted) should be penalized according to the extent.

Color
The Border Collie appears in all colors or combination of colors and/or markings. Solid color, bi-color, tri-color, merle and sable dogs are to be judged equally with no one color or pattern preferred over another. White markings may be clear white or ticked to any degree. Random white patches on the body and head are permissible but should not predominate. Color and markings are always secondary to physical evaluation and gait.

Gait
The Border Collie is an agile dog, able to suddenly change speed and direction while maintaining balance and grace. Endurance is its trademark. The Border Collie's most used working gaits are the gallop and a moving crouch (stealth) which convert to a balanced and free trot, with minimum lift of the feet. The head is carried level with or slightly below the withers. When shown, Border Collies should move on a loose lead and at moderate speed, never raced around the ring with the head held high. When viewed from the side the trot is not long striding, yet covers the ground with minimum effort, exhibiting facility of movement rather than a hard driving action. Exaggerated reach and drive at the trot are not useful to the Border Collie. The topline is firm. Viewed from the front, action is forward and true without wasted motion. Viewed from the rear, hindquarters drive with thrust and flexibility with hocks turning neither in nor out, moving close together but never touching. The legs, both front and rear, tend to converge toward the center line as speed increases. Any deficiency that detracts from efficient movement is a fault.

Temperament
The Border Collie is energetic, intelligent, keen, alert, and responsive. An intense worker of great tractability, it is affectionate towards friends but may be sensibly reserved towards strangers. When approached, the Border Collie should stand its ground. It should be alert and interested, never showing fear, dullness or resentment. Any tendencies toward viciousness, nervousness or shyness are very serious faults.

Faults
Any deviation from the foregoing should be considered a fault, the seriousness of the fault depending upon the extent of the deviation.

Approved: January 13, 2004
Effective: March 2, 2004



Historikk:

The exact origins of the domestic dog are locked in time and subject to speculation, but it is clear that after the development of dogs used by man to hunt, sheepdogs of various kinds were created worldwide to protect the flocks. Since Biblical times, flocks of goats, sheep, and cattle were the measure of individual wealth. Consequently, the development of a reliable dog to drive and protect these flocks was a primary concern. Sheepdogs of all breeds are noted for their sagacity, intelligence, and trainability. Rather than savage a flock as a wild dog would, sheepdogs willingly protect it. And it is this active ability of the dog to serve and respond to a master's bidding which clearly demarcates C. familiaris from any of the wild canids. These are the traits of workability which were selected for in the development of the various sheepdog breeds.

The craft of tending sheep was introduced to the British Isles by the Romans. Various Celtic clans soon created their own varieties of sheepdogs to work these flocks. These dogs became associated with their regions and were later known as Welsh Sheepdogs, Northern Sheepdogs, Highland Collies, Scotch Collies, and so on. While the antecedents of the Border Collie developed throughout the British Isles, its Scottish heritage is evident in the Scottish dialect word, "collie," used to describe these dogs. Thomas Bewick's wood engravings in The History of Quadrupeds, a pre-1800 work, resemble both the smooth and rough varieties of today's breed.

In 1860, classes for "Scotch Sheep Dogs" were offered at the Birmingham Dog Society the second dog show ever held in England. On a trip to Balmoral a short time later, Queen Victioria saw her first Collie and became an active enthusiast of the breed. It is at this point that the divergence between our modern Collie and the traditional shepherd's dog began. However, today's Border Collie has remained a true working animal with very little change from the original type.

Credit is given to Mr. R.J. Lloyd Price for the institution of sheepdog trials. In 1876, he brought 100 wild Welsh sheep to the Alexandra Palace in London for a demonstration. Three sheep were picked out of the flock, which had been guided to a remote corner of the park, and were carried to a far hill and released. The sheepdogs' responsibilities were to fold the sheep into a small pen in the middle of the park. An account in the Live Stock Journal described the astonishment of the spectators at the intelligence of the dogs whose only assistance was in the form of hand signals and whistles from their masters. It is this astonishing ability which serious Border Collie breeders wish to retain in the breed, above all else.

Recognized worldwide as the premier sheepherding dog, known for its obedience, trainability and natural appearance, the Border Collie was given Herding Group designation and became eligible for full recognition status on October 1, 1995.



Farger og egenheter:

Colors
 
Description Type Code
 
Black S 007
Blue S 037
Blue Merle S 050
Brindle S 057
Gold S 091
Lilac S 504
Red S 140
Red Merle S 276
Sable S 164
Sable Merle S 166
Saddleback Sable S 505
White & Black S 202
White & Blue S 288
White & Blue Merle S 363
White & Red S 214
White & Red Merle S 506
White Ticked S 507
 
Markings
 
Description Type Code
 
Tan Points S 029
White Markings S 014
White Markings, Brindle Points S 441
White Markings, Tan Points S 030
White Markings, Ticked S 439
White Mkng, Brindle Pt, Ticked S 442
White Mrkngs, Tan Pts, Ticked S 440

 




Visste du?

  • The Border Collie is AKC's 139th breed.
  • The Border Collie was featured in the hit movie, "Babe".
  • "Collie" is a Scottish dialect word used to describe sheepdogs, including Border Collies.
  • The 18th century poet laureate of Scotland, Robert Burns, accurately described the essence of the Border Collie, describing it as "honest" and "faithful".
  • The Border Collie was first classified as the "Scotch Sheep Dog".
  • In the second half of the 19th century, Queen Victoria spotted a Border Collie and became an active enthusiast (at this point, the divergence between our modern Collie and the Border Collie began).
  • Border Collies are famous for their work in sheepherding, including sheepherding trials; a Border Collie fancier, Mr. R.J. Lloyd Price, is credited with the institution of sheepdog trials in 1876.